Nourishing Your Body for Better Health

Topic: Newsletters

Gluten Freedom-A Review & Giveaway

In the 7 years I’ve begluten freedomen writing monthly gluten-free newsletters, I’ve never dedicated a whole newsletter to a review. This is the exception, of course, because I am absolutely delighted to have a chance to review AND do a giveaway of Gluten Freedom, Dr. Fasano’s new book, which will be released on May 1st, 2014. As I’m sure most of you know, Dr. Fasano is one of the leading experts in Celiac disease and gluten sensitivity worldwide, and most people consider him THE leading expert. I have utmost respect for Dr. Fasano and the Center for Celiac Research and the amazing work they’ve done over the years. I’ve also had the pleasure to meet Dr. Fasano, and I’m amazed that he’s such a down-to-earth, funny guy. He’s got that rare blend of brilliance with the ability to connect with people on a human level.

So yes, I’m definitely a fan.

Turner Publishing was kind enough to provide me a review copy, which I’ve read cover to cover. This is a must-read for any with Celiac and/or gluten sensitivity, and anyone who  if fascinated by these conditions.

The first several chapters lay out the history of Celiac research in the U.S. and gluten sensitivity. He then dives into hot topics, like autoimmunity and leaky gut, the gluten-brain connection, Celiac pregnancy, g-free in college, gluten-free as we age, and much, much more. He touches on key questions, like autism and schizophrenia. He even covers new therapies and treatments coming down the pike, apps, resources and more. Should everyone be gluten-free? Do you need to avoid all products containing “made in a factory that processes wheat?” Dr. Fasano answers those directly, too.

My favorite parts?

  • There are lots of great case studies. Dr. Fasano tells a story of a patient who has Hashimoto’s, and she was quite underweight. Her thyroid antibody numbers were elevated, and her docs said nothing could be done and medication was inevitable. Since the girl didn’t have Celiac, the docs dismissed any possible gluten-thyroid link, but her father was intent on giving it a go regardless. And, as you might guess, the girl had a profound response to a gluten-free diet, and improved appetite and growth, and her antibodies dropped, too. (Of course, this isn’t presented as a guarantee, but since it does happen for some, I’m really glad to see stories like these highlighted.)
  • There’s a great story of a boy who presented with symptoms like autism. He actually had Celiac disease, and his symptoms resolved on the gluten-free diet.
  • There’s also a fascinating discussion on the possible role of tTG 6 in the gluten/ schizophrenia link in neuro inflammation
  • According to new data, ~10-20% of people with Celiac will have negative blood test results. That’s a higher number than I’ve seen in the past.
  • The latest and greatest future treatments and prevention of Celiac
  • …and much more.

I think anyone with Celiac or NCGS will love this book, and health care professionals, too. It does touch on gluten-free basics, label reading and there’s even a chapter on setting up a gluten-free kitchen with Jules Sheperd, but it’s probably not the best fit for someone just diagnosed 5 minutes ago mainly looking for coping strategies and baking tips.

Oh, and the best part? 100% of the proceeds from the sale of Gluten Freedom go to the Center for Celiac Research. It’s on sale through Amazon now, and will be released at the end of April.

And so…you know you need this book. I asked Turner Publishing if I could do a giveaway, and they agreed. Here’s what you need to do to enter:

  1. Why are you most excited about this book? Leave me a comment below
  2. Follow Center for Celiac Research on Twitter, and leave me a comment below to let me know you did.
  3. “Like” Center for Celiac Research on Facebook and leave me a comment below to let me know you did.
  4. Follow me on Twitter, @CherylHarrisRD and leave me a comment below to let me know you did.
  5. Follow Turner Publishing on Twitter and leave me a comment below to let me know you did.
  6. Post about this giveaway on Facebook and leave me a comment below to let me know you did.
  7. Post about this giveaway on Twitter and leave me a comment below to let me know you did.

That’s a total of 7 separate possible entries. Please leave a separate comment for each entry so that I can easily keep track!

This giveaway will be open until Saturday, April 19th EST, 2014.

Many thanks to Turner Publishing for allowing me to do this giveaway, and providing me an advanced copy of Gluten Freedom.

Disclaimer: I did receive a free copy of this book, and that did not influence my views in this review. I was not compensated for this review.

G-Free Passover Finds

  • G-free Passover rules & finds

  • Recipes

  • News & fun stuff

Gluten-free Passover foods:

Passover isn’t here until April 14th but many of the products are already appearing in grocery stores. Not all Passover foods are gluten-free, but many are, and there’s a much wider selection than usual at the grocery store. This can be a good time to stock up on GF cakes and mixes, cookies, macaroons, “bread” crumbs and supplies like potato starch. As an added bonus for people with multiple restrictions, most Kosher for Passover products contain no corn or soy products, either.

In a nutshell, the basic rule of foods for Passover is no leavened foods, which eliminates normal breads, cakes etc. Matzo is the main exception. Matzo is an unleavened bread usually made from wheat and is eaten regularly, and some products contain products Matzo and matzo meal, which also potentially listed as cake meal or farfel. However, many products don’t contain gluten. Or, if you find products labeled “non-gebrok or gebroktz or grebrochts” (or another spelling variation) they’re non-grain containing and therefore have no gluten-containing ingredients. Often Koshecharosetr for Passover products and cakes are made of potato flour or nut meals rather than wheat or glutinous grains.

As always in the gluten-free world, read labels carefully. “Kosher” and “Kosher for Passover” are two different things entirely. Kosher for Passover foods will be labeled “May be used for Passover” or have a symbol that says OUP. I have often seen “regular” Kosher foods in the Passover section at grocery stores, so please do check the labels very carefully.

Keep in mind that many Passover foods are imported from other countries. Technically, imports must follow the FDA allergen labeling laws, but I can say I’ve seen many that aren’t labeled quite in the same way as the FALCPA U.S. labeling laws dictate.  The flip side is that a claim of “gluten free” is more meaningful in Europe or Israel, because the g-free labeling here doesn’t go into effect until August 2014. So the label on an import may say matzo, but may not say “wheat” explicitly or have the disclaimer stating that it contains wheat.

Most Kosher for Passover products will have to adhere to strict standards for cross contamination from a religious perspective. Voluntary allergen labeling statements (AKA “Made in a factory” claims) are still not regulated.

From a gluten-free perspective, possibly the best part of Passover is AFTER Passover, when all of the great gluten-free goodies are on sale! Passover ends April 22nd, so mark your calendars, because the word has gotten out in gluten-free circles and the mad rush is on.

Back when you really couldn’t get GF prepared foods in the regular grocery store, this was a much bigger deal. But it’s still nicer to have an expanded selection, and nicest of all is AFTER Passover, when all of the products are on sale!OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

For people who DO celebrate the actual holiday of Passover, not just the gluten-free food, here are some great recipes and information:

Other favorite gluten-free recipe sites for Passover? Let me know in the comments section on my website.

Lately, Whole Foods has stocked a gluten-free Matzah, and the brand is Yehuda, so keep your eyes peeled! You can also get it on Amazon. It’s not technically matza because it’s not made of oats, but it’s “Matzo style squares”. There are also many more Kosher markets, such as Kosher Mart in Rockville. Some local grocery stores also have a great selection.
You can also buy gluten-free oat matzoh made from certified gluten-free oats. The only downside is that it is insanely expensive!

———————————————-

News:mini washingtonina

———————————————-

Cheryl Harris, MPH, RD is a Registered Dietitian, Nutritionist and Certified Wellcoach in Fairfax & Alexandria, VA. I work with people to feel and look their best with a range of specialties, including Celiac Disease, GI issues,  food allergies, pregnancy, breastfeeding, vegetarian and vegan diets, preventing diseases and “whole foods” eating. Let’s get you on your way to achieving your goals.  Email me or call 571-271-8742. 

5 Quick Healthy Eating Tips

March is National Nutrition Month, and to celebrate, I’m sharing my top 5 healthy habits that work best for my family. I’d also love for you to let me know some of your favorite ideas and have a small giveaway (see below)

  1. Stock up on what you want to be eating: Research says that the nutrition gatekeeper (ie. the primary shopper) controls approximately 72% of what families eat. That make sense on a lot of levels. Generally, it’s easier to say “no” once in the grocery store than to say “no” each and every day when the pOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAotato chips call your name. Besides, most of us aren’t motivated enough to get up, get dressed, get in the car and drive to the store for a minor chocolate craving, but if it’s a few steps away…
  2. Pack lunch the night before. Even if I’ve gotten a good night sleep, I’m not terribly lucid first thing in the morning. Leaving lunch decisions to the morning greatly raises the chances that I forget, run out of time, or end up with the quickest thing I can possibly grab, which is generally not nutritionally balanced. It’s much easier to plan ahead and get everything set after dinner the night before.
  3. Frozen veggies: we’ve always got a few bags on hand in case I run out of time or we need to make a last minute change of plans.. Unlike canned veggies, which are often heat treated and loaded with salt, frozen vegetables are often healthier than fresh in winter months because the nutrients aren’t lost as the veggies travel from, say, Peru or Chile.
  4. Make multiple servings: it’s extremely rare that I’ll cook just enough for one meal, or even two. If I make a chicken, it’ll be with veggies that night, and it’ll re-appear on a salad for lunch the next day, possibly as a stir fry for the following dinner, etc. If it’s a too much for us to finish without it going bad or getting reaaaly boring, it’ll be portioned out and become a frozen dinner for another day.
  5. Plan ahead for the week: For some people, that means writing out menus and/or a shopping list each week. For others, it’s always having ingredients for quick meals on hand. I confess that I’m not a list person, but I do always make sure we’ve got a variety of easy options. Especially when we’re out of town on the weekend or have a packed week, I make sure that I’ve got the basics on hand. I like Relay Foods (affiliate link for $30 off a $50 order), which has delivery of local and sustainable produce and meats. It even has a pick up option at the Eisenhower Metro, which is just up the road falmond containerrom my Alexandria office. Washington’s Green Grocer has a similar system and I’ve used it for years, but I personally tend to prefer Relay because I like knowing which farm I’m buying from. Also, getting non-perishables on Amazon can be a huge time and energy saver—we tend to stock up on things like beans, soups, snacks and paper goods that we know we’ll use and it saves me from having to run to 4 different stores to get what I want.

Giveaway: What are your favorite tips for staying healthy? Leave me a comment, and if it’s one of my favorites, I’ll send you a cute little .5 oz almonds tin from the Almond board (US only). It’s great for snacks…and shhh, don’t tell, it’s the perfect size for any kind of nuts or seeds you like to snack on.

News:mini washingtonina

Harris Whole Health offers individual sessions, family sessions and group classes to help people eat healthier and feel better! Cheryl works with people to feel and look their best with a range of specialties, including Celiac Disease, food allergies, pregnancy, breastfeeding, vegetarian and vegan diets, preventing diseases and “whole foods” eating. Let’s get you on your way to achieving your goals. For an appointment with Cheryl Harris, Registered Dietitian and Nutritionist, please click here, email or call 571-271-8742.

To subscribe or unsubscribe, see www.harriswholehealth.com

Feb G-Free Treats & news

Fish update: The Environmental Working Group (the fine folks that put together the Dirty Dozen list) have new fish recommendations as of Jan 2014. I have a summary and my thoughts here. While the omega 3s from fish are important for everyone in terms of heart health, triglycerides, etc., they’re particularly useful for the gluten-free community, since they reduce inflammation. Autoimmune diseases are inflammatory, and there’s specific research on omega 3s on conditions that are linked to Celiac and gluten sensitivity, such as Rheumatoid Arthritis, Sjogren’s, bipolar disorder, Schizophrenia, MS, IBD (Ulcerative Colitis and Crohn’s), and many others.

Fun stuff:

Recipes: Looking for something fun and delicious to make someone you love (possibly yourself, of course!)

tuxedo strawberriers

 

 

 

 

 

Tuxedoed Strawberries Fruit in tasty formal ware. What’s not to love?

chocoraspslice

 

Chocolate Raspberry Pie Yes, there’s a secret ingredient, but don’t let that scare you. Bloggers at the Washingtonian tried it and gave it a thumbs up!

Hubby’s favorites:

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Chocolate Covered Candied Orange Peels A favorite of many of my husbands, and many of our friends.

thanks cake

 

 

 

E’s Cake (aka chocolate hazelnut torte) I was so lucky that one of my favorite torte recipes just happened to be gluten-free.

Harris Whole Health offers individual sessions, family sessions and group classes to help people eat healthier and feel better! Cheryl works with people to feel and look their best with a range of specialties, including Celiac Disease, food allergies, pregnancy, breastfeeding, vegetarian and vegan diets, preventing diseases and “whole foods” eating. Let’s get you on your way to achieving your goals. For an appointment with Cheryl Harris, Registered Dietitian and Nutritionist, please click here, email or call 571-271-8742.

To subscribe or unsubscribe, see www.harriswholehealth.com

 

Go fish–New 2014 Advice

I’m a big advocate of fish, as many of you know. Not only does the  American Heart pestoed fishAssociation recommend 2 or more servings of fish a week, but the American Psychological Association  has a similar recommendation for depression and mood disorders. There are so many reasons why fish can be beneficial–omega 3 fatty acids are anti-inflammatory and may help with conditions from high triglycerides, rheumatoid arthritis, macular eye degeneration, high blood pressure and the list just goes on. The omega 3s can also be an IQ booster for babies, too.

So I was fascinated to see a new report out from the Environmental Working Group in January 2014 on mercury risk that *ahem!* rocks the boat, because that’s a critical piece of the puzzle and a major stumbling block to eating more fish for many people. The EWG report reviews the literature that goes into the latest data on mercury in fish, and states that following the current EPA guidance isn’t enough to keep people safe from mercury issues, and takes issue with the current “safe dose” methodology. Basically, the big fishies have eaten a bunch of little fishies, and so they bio accumulate mercury. Not good.

The EWG list goes much further than the EPA guidance, and adds more fish to the “no” column, especially for pregnant women and children:fishie listSource: Environmental Working Group, 2014 http://www.ewg.org/research/us-gives-seafood-eaters-flawed-advice-on-mercury-contamination-healthy-omega-3s

The EPA guidance is from 2004, and gives some basics on fish to avoid, such as:

  • Shark
  • King Mackerel
  • Tilefish
  • Swordfish

My view is that I’d rather have clients be safe than sorry. So the message here shouldn’t be to ditch fish. Instead, choose more wisely. There are still many good options that are both high in omega 3s and low in mercury, such as salmon, sardines, trout, mussles, herring, and even anchovies.

  • For those of you who want to eat more fish, but aren’t quite sure how to prep it, I like the book For Cod and Country which does a good job with simple, tasty AND sustainable. How to Cook Everything  by Mark Bittman is also one of my favorite basic cookbooks, but doesn’t have the health/sustainability emphasis.
  • Wait, wait. Does this mean never ever eating a tuna fish sandwich? Oy. Well, that depends. For children and smaller women, even light tuna once a week is too much. It doesn’t mean never, but for most people, it’s not a good daily or weekly choice.
  • What about sustainability and the environment, the politics and health of wild/vs. farmed, etc.?  That’s a whole different discussion!  The short answer is to check out a seafood guide, such as the one from the Environmental Defense Fund Seafood guide and  Monterey Bay Aquarium. They’ve got a nifty (free!) app, too.
  • Thinking outside of the fishbowl? How about the flaxseed you’re adding to your yogurt faithfully every day?  That has omega 3s, too, as does walnuts, canola oil, soy, chia seed and more.  This form of omega 3s, called ALA, does have health benefits. However, it does not seem to have all of the same benefits as the omegas in fish.
  • But what about if you’re vegan or allergic to fish? There are DHA supplements available that are derived from algae. Again, our bodies don’t utilize them as well.

Speaking of supplements, generally, a low dose (around 1 gram) is generally considered satuxedo strawberriersfe, but definitely don’t go for high dose supplements (over 3 grams) without having a chat with your doctor.

Recipes: Looking for something fun and delicious to make someone you love (possibly yourself?)
My favorites:

Tuxedoed Strawberrieschocoraspslice

Chocolate Raspberry Pie 

Hubby’s favorites:

Chocolate Covered Candied Orange Peels   OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

Fun stuff:

I’ll be presenting a webinar for the Tidewater Food Allergy Support Group on Feb 11th, 2014 on “Mission possible: a balanced diet with food allergies.”

Harris Whole Health offers individual sessions, family sessions and group classes to help people eat healthier and feel better! Cheryl works with people to feel and look their best with a range of specialties, including Celiac Disease, food allergies, pregnancy, breastfeeding, vegetarian and vegan diets, preventing diseases and “whole foods” eating. Let’s get you on your way to achieving your goals. For an appointment with Cheryl Harris, Registered Dietitian and Nutritionist, please click here, email or call 571-271-8742.

To subscribe or unsubscribe, see www.harriswholehealth.com

Healthy Habits that Stick

 

It’s that time of year where we resolve to start exercising, eating right, drinking more water and using more recycled bags to the store. I’m sure many of you have set resolutions or even goals. As a nutritionist and coach, I’ve seen such a range of experiences in my clients, and here are a few things I’d encourage you to consider.

  1. Why is this super-wonderful new habit really important to you now?

Knowing your motivation is a powerful thing, and can help you build in structure to stay focused on what you value most. When I see clients, one my first questions is what they’re hoping to accomplish. When the answer is “Because Dr. So and so says so” or “I know I really should” or “It would make XXX happy” it’s a big red flag and we have to dig deeper and develop personally meaningful goals.

2.    What is your baseline?

Often we don’t have a good sense of our current habits. Many people report eating veggies every day or only occasionally going on a Starbucks run, but when they record their food for a few weeks, it becomes clear that the reality is quite a bit different. I definitely recommend keeping track of food, exercise or other habits the old fashioned way with pen and paper, on a website like www.sparkpeople.com or www.nutritiondata.com or on an app like My Fitness Pal or Lose it. In fact, tracking your food is one of the top recommendations from the National Weight Control registry.

3.     How much are you eating?OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Take a look at those two pictures. Which has more food? Actually, it’s the very same food, photographed on a 11 inch plate on the left and a 9 inch plate on the right. Research shows we eat about 30% on the bigger plate. Amazing how much of a difference small choices in our environment can make! We live in a super-sized culture, and almost all of us fall prey to the ginormous sizes we see all around us. Studies show that everything from portion sizes to plates to colors or even names of food dramatically change our intake, and often small tweaks can significantly change our behaviors. If you haven’t read Brian Wansink’s Mindless Eating, it’s a fantastic read with a nice mix of research and easy tools to incorporate in your daily routine.

4.   How mindful are you?meditation bell

Most of us live pretty distracted lives. If we’re not paying attention to our life, we’re missing out on the fun! It’s easy to eat while checking email, watching TV, or even driving, and that cuts down on our awareness of portion and on our enjoyment of food. When we’re eating mindfully, we’re much more aware of hunger and fullness, and it’s much easier to stop eating because we’re full than because we’re only allowed a certain amount. Additionally, mindfulness has a huge range of health benefits, from improving depression, to blood pressure, to immunity to diabetes and much more. I’ve got a lot of the research on the benefits of mindful eating here.

5.   Do you have support?

Generally, healthy habits take a village. It’s easier to get up on those cold, dark mornings when you’re meeting a friend or you’ve got a four-legged friend who wants to go for a run. Likewise, it’s easier to eat well with support than constantly seeing tempting foods that are off-limits. It’s critical to build in support in person or online for a sense of accountability.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Recipes:

There are so many great recipe sites out here. Here are some of my favorites!

  • 101 Recipes: There are many great soup and vegetarian recipes, and many feature veggies and whole grains.
  • Dr. Weil has great healthy recipes listed.
  • Elana’s Pantry: Curious about almond flour?  Elana’s pantry should be your first stop!  She also has a lot of wonderful veggie recipes and tips for children, too.
  •  Health-e-Recipes from AICR (American Institute for Cancer Research). You can sign up for newsletters on their site, and you get weekly recipes in your inbox. Many (not all) are gluten-free and dairy free. Many are quick and simple, use seasonal ingredients, and feature a lot of veggies.
  • Meatless Monday: A great site for people who want to include more fruits, veggies, beans and fiber in their diet.
  • Kalyn’s Kitchen: Mostly low carb, and everything I’ve made has been delicious. Many food recipes (not just desserts) and many, but not all are gluten-free.
  • Simply Recipes: Simple recipes with whole, unprocessed foods. Some GF, some not, but the site has many great ways for preparing veggies.
  • Whole Life Nutrition Kitchen http://www.nourishingmeals.com/ Healthy whole food based meals
  •  World’s Healthiest Foods: Good, basic healthy recipes.  Most are gluten-free, but you can check off the foods you want to avoid for a recipe search.
  • Ultrawellness Center –great elimination diet recipes

I have even more recipe & sites listed at http://www.harriswholehealth.com/recipes/  And, of course, there are more websites and resources popping up every day! Do you have a favorite healthy recipe site that isn’t listed?  Leave me a comment and let me know!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

New Live Webinar on Jan 15th, 2pm-4pm EST

Join me for a 2 hour webinar on “Celiac Disease: What Every RD Should Know” through Dietitian Central.

Upon successful completion of this 2 hour course, the participant should be able to:

  • Understand the biology behind Celiac disease
  • Recognize our changing understanding of the symptoms of Celiac, prevalence, etc.
  • Describe which testing methods are scientifically valid
  • Identify which foods have gluten
  • Find gluten on labels in live exercises
  • Discuss the new laws for 2014 and how they affect clients
  • Describe current controversies around alcohol and current controversies
  • List foods at high risk of cross-contamination
  • Identify the best resources for RDs and clients

To register, see Dietitian Central’s site.

Harris Whole Health offers individual sessions, family sessions and group classes to help people eat healthier and feel better! Cheryl works with people to feel and look their best with a range of specialties, including Celiac Disease, food allergies, pregnancy, breastfeeding, vegetarian and vegan diets, preventing diseases and “whole foods” eating. Let’s get you on your way to achieving your goals. For an appointment with Cheryl Harris, Registered Dietitian and Nutritionist, please click here, email or call 571-271-8742.

To subscribe or unsubscribe, see www.harriswholehealth.com

Healthy G-Free Habits

bowl of basil

It’s that time of year where we resolve to start exercising, eating right, drinking more water and using more recycled bags to the store. I’m sure many of you have set resolutions or even goals. As a nutritionist and coach, I’ve seen such a range of experiences in my clients, and here are a few things I’d encourage you to consider.

  1. Why is this super-wonderful new habit really important to you now?

Knowing your motivation is a powerful thing, and can help you build in structure to stay focused on what you value most. When I see clients, one my first questions is what they’re hoping to accomplish. When the answer is “Because Dr. So and so says so” or “I know I really should” or “It would make XXX happy” it’s a big red flag and we have to dig deeper and develop personally meaningful goals.

2.    What is your baseline?

Often we don’t have a good sense of our current habits. Many people report eating veggies every day or only occasionally going on a Starbucks run, but when they record their food for a few weeks, it becomes clear that the reality is quite a bit different. I definitely recommend keeping track of food, exercise or other habits the old fashioned way with pen and paper, on a website like www.sparkpeople.com or www.nutritiondata.com or on an app like My Fitness Pal or Lose it. In fact, tracking your food is one of the top recommendations from the National Weight Control registry.

3.     How much are you eating?OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

 

 

 

 

 

Take a look at those two pictures. Which has more food? Actually, it’s the very same food, photographed on a 11 inch plate on the left and a 9 inch plate on the right. Research shows we eat about 30% on the bigger plate. Amazing how much of a difference small choices in our environment can make! We live in a super-sized culture, and almost all of us fall prey to the ginormous sizes we see all around us. Studies show that everything from portion sizes to plates to colors or even names of food dramatically change our intake, and often small tweaks can significantly change our behaviors. If you haven’t read Brian Wansink’s Mindless Eating, it’s a fantastic read with a nice mix of research and easy tools to incorporate in your daily routine.

4.   How mindful are you?meditation bell

Most of us live pretty distracted lives. If we’re not paying attention to our life, we’re missing out on the fun! It’s easy to eat while checking email, watching TV, or even driving, and that cuts down on our awareness of portion and on our enjoyment of food. When we’re eating mindfully, we’re much more aware of hunger and fullness, and it’s much easier to stop eating because we’re full than because we’re only allowed a certain amount. Additionally, mindfulness has a huge range of health benefits, from improving depression, to blood pressure, to immunity to diabetes and much more. I’ve got a lot of the research on the benefits of mindful eating here.

5.   Do you have support?

Generally, healthy habits take a village. It’s easier to get up on those cold, dark mornings when you’re meeting a friend or you’ve got a four-legged friend who wants to go for a run. Likewise, it’s easier to eat well with support than constantly seeing tempting foods that are off-limits. It’s critical to build in support in person or online for a sense of accountability.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Recipes:

I know there are so many variations on gluten-free, so here are a wide variety of gluten-free recipes sites that can help you get going, too.

  •  Bob’s Red Mill features many gluten-free and whole grain recipes.  Search under “gluten-free”
  • Dr. Weil has great healthy recipes listed.  Most (not all) are GF
  • Diet, Dessert and Dogs (now Ricki Heller.com): Gluten-free? (check!) dairy-free? (check!) vegan? (check!) delicious? (check!) Ricki’s recipes are wonderful , no matter your food restrictions, and many are grain-free as well.  She also has a variety of e-books on her website. *note–there are a few gluten-full recipes still lurking on older pages, so keep an eye out for spelt or barley flour.
  • Elana’s Pantry: Curious about almond flour?  Elana’s pantry should be your first stop!  She also has a lot of wonderful veggie recipes and tips for children, too.
  • Ginger Lemon Girl: Most of the newer recipes are paleo friendly, most of the older ones are decadent, but all are gluten-free
  • Gluten-free Goodness: my blog, which is gluten, dairy, egg, corn, soy and usually sugar free.  Most of the time the recipes are healthy.
  • Gluten-free For Good. Great gluten-free and healthy recipes and information on healthy foods, too.
  •  Health-e-Recipes from AICR (American Institute for Cancer Research). You can sign up for newsletters on their site, and you get weekly recipes in your inbox. Many (not all) are gluten-free and dairy free. Many are quick and simple, use seasonal ingredients, and feature a lot of veggies.
  • Kalyn’s Kitchen: Mostly low carb, and everything I’ve made has been delicious. Many food recipes (not just desserts) and many, but not all are gluten-free.
  • Simply Sugar and Gluten Free—Amy’s website and cookbook have a lot of wonderful options.
  • Spicy RD Nutrition: Fellow RD EA Stewart shares a wide variety of beautiful gluten-free recipes on her website.
  • The Spunky Coconut: Kelly’s recipes often include beans and veggies in unusual, but tasty ways.  Many are grain-free and allergen friendly, all are gluten-free.
  • Vegan, (almost entirely) gluten-free cookbooks from Vitalita by Mark Foy. There are two free downloadable books. Even if you’re not vegan, it’s yummy! Vegan cookbooks are a great resource if you can’t eat dairy or eggs.
  • Whole Life Nutrition Kitchen http://www.nourishingmeals.com/ Gluten-free, healthy whole food based meals
  •  World’s Healthiest Foods: Good, basic healthy recipes.  Most are gluten-free, but you can check off the foods you want to avoid for a recipe search.

I have even more recipe & sites listed at http://www.harriswholehealth.com/recipes/  And, of course, there are more websites and resources popping up every day! Do you have a favorite healthy recipe site that isn’t listed?  Leave me a comment and let me know!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

New Live Webinar on Jan 15th, 2pm-4pm EST

Join me for a 2 hour webinar on “Celiac Disease: What Every RD Should Know” through Dietitian Central.

Upon successful completion of this 2 hour course, the participant should be able to:

  • Understand the biology behind Celiac disease
  • Recognize our changing understanding of the symptoms of Celiac, prevalence, etc.
  • Describe which testing methods are scientifically valid
  • Identify which foods have gluten
  • Find gluten on labels in live exercises
  • Discuss the new laws for 2014 and how they affect clients
  • Describe current controversies around alcohol and current controversies
  • List foods at high risk of cross-contamination
  • Identify the best resources for RDs and clients

To register, see Dietitian Central’s site.

Harris Whole Health offers individual sessions, family sessions and group classes to help people eat healthier and feel better! Cheryl works with people to feel and look their best with a range of specialties, including Celiac Disease, food allergies, pregnancy, breastfeeding, vegetarian and vegan diets, preventing diseases and “whole foods” eating. Let’s get you on your way to achieving your goals. For an appointment with Cheryl Harris, Registered Dietitian and Nutritionist, please click here, email or call 571-271-8742.

To subscribe or unsubscribe, see www.harriswholehealth.com

A Happy, Healthy Holiday-2013 Newsletter

Hopefully you’re all staying warm and cozy this December. It’s always a busy time for everyone, so here’s some good stuff for surviving and thriving this holiday season.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Wintertime generally means cold, and to me that means soup. Whenever I can, I make my own–this picture is leftover turkey soup, and I love my Red Lentil Dal, Creamy Veggie SoupSniffle Stew…the list is endless!

Canned soup is a also great fallback. Here’s a list of soups that avoid BPA. BPA is an additive in many can liners, and the link explains more on the reasons why I’m not a big fan of it, especially for people with PCOS and/or endocrine conditions.

Of course, December is famous for reasons other than soup. For most people, mindless munching is also a huge part of the season, so here are my top 5 holiday mindless eating tips:

  1. Survey your options: Research shows that people at a normal weight are more likely to survey all of their options, then hone in on what they most enjoy. Otherwise, we have much more of a tendency to keep going back. Standing further from the buffet, facing away from the food and engaging in something else fun (conversation, dancing, photography) also can be a help. pome
  2. Surround yourself with what you want to see. Remember all that talk about a see-food and eat it diet? Make sure you’re seeing the foods you want to be eating. Put seasonal fruits such as grapefruits, mangos and my personal favorites, pomegranates, on the counter or in your refrigerator where they are easy to grab. Bonus points for putting them at eye level!
  3. Choose the special foods: If you can’t live without mint fudge, then plan to have a piece or two! Skip on the “filler” foods you can have every day, like chips and dip or even booze.
  4. Limit alcohol. I know that’s not always the easiest sell, but sometimes it’s helpful to consider which you’d enjoy more, that truffle or that 2nd glass of wine. Not only is alcohol empty calories that slow your metabolism, but it can be harder to make good choices after you’ve had a few. It can help to set a target before you go. WaPo included some of my tips for reducing excess last year.
  5. Keep the evidence: Out of sight, out of mind, right? If you don’t keep the wrappers or plate, it’s easier to conveniently forget how many mini plates you’ve already munched through.

Wishing you a warm and wonderful holiday season, and a happy New Year!

Harris Whole Health offers individual sessions, family sessions and group classes to help people eat healthier and feel better! Cheryl works with people to feel and look their best with a range of specialties, including Celiac Disease, food allergies, pregnancy, breastfeeding, vegetarian and vegan diets, preventing diseases and “whole foods” eating. Let’s get you on your way to achieving your goals. For an appointment with Cheryl Harris, Registered Dietitian and Nutritionist, please click here, email or call 571-271-8742.

To subscribe or unsubscribe, see www.harriswholehealth.com

G-Free Holiday Season: Dec Newsletter

Whew! December is a busy time for everyone, so here’s some good stuff for surviving and thriving this holiday season.

For many people, the holiday season is one of the most challenging times to be gluten-free. I’ve highlighted some of my favorite tips for staying SANE and gluten-free here from Simply Gluten-Free Magazine. And along the lines of sanity, I host a December Sanity Virtual Retreat every year with the help of other g-free bloggers with fun prizes. This year, I’m joined by Kate of Eat, Recycle, Repeat, Carrie of Ginger Lemon Girl and Valerie of City Life Eats. fudge

Of course, this time of year is pretty much  about desserts, yes? Some of us aren’t all about mixing 5 different gluten-free flours and whipping out the xantham gum. I’ve collected a list of NATURALLY gluten-free desserts over the years—foolproof recipes that aren’t specialty cooking, but just happen to be marvelously gluten-free.

My personal favorites? My Bittersweet Chestnut Fudge and my Vegan Pralines.

Oh, right, and there’s food, too. Got a gluten-free meal? I’ve got a G-Free Turkey and Ham list for 2013.

It’s also a season of overdoing, so here are my top 5 holiday mindless eating tips:

  1. Surround yourself with what you want to see. Remember all that talk about a see-food and eat it clemntinesdiet? Make sure you’re seeing the foods you want to be eating. Put seasonal fruits such as grapefruits, pomegranates,and mangos on the counter or in your refrigerator where they are easy to grab. Bonus points for putting them at eye level!
  2. Survey your options: Research shows that people at a normal weight are more likely to survey all of their options, then hone in on what they’ll most enjoy. Otherwise, we have much more of a tendency to keep going back. Standing further from the buffet, facing away and engaging in something else fun (conversation, dancing, photography) also can be a help.
  3. Choose the special foods: If you can’t live without gluten-free brownies, then plan them in! Skip on the “filler” foods you can have every day, like chips and dip or even booze.
  4. Limit alcohol! Not only is alcohol empty calories that slow your metabolism, but it can be harder to make good choices after you’ve had a few. It can help to set a target before you go, and to consider which you’d enjoy more, that piece of g-free pie or that 2nd glass of wine. WaPo included some of my tips for reducing excess last year.
  5. Keep the evidence: Out of sight, out of mind, right? If you don’t keep the wrappers or plate, it’s easier to conveniently forget how many mini plates you’ve already nibbled through.

More recipes from around the web:OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Local Events:

DC Area Metro Celiac Organization

Harris Whole Health offers individual sessions, family sessions and group classes to help people eat healthier and feel better! Cheryl works with people to feel and look their best with a range of specialties, including Celiac Disease, food allergies, pregnancy, breastfeeding, vegetarian and vegan diets, preventing diseases and “whole foods” eating. Let’s get you on your way to achieving your goals. For an appointment with Cheryl Harris, Registered Dietitian and Nutritionist, please click here, email or call 571-271-8742.

 

Healthy Holiday Tips!

We’re getting close to the peak of eating and shopping season. Some days, it seems like our main form of exercise is usually moving the fork from the plate to our mouths. Here are some ways to enjoy the spirit of the season and favorite holiday foods, while staying healthy, too.

Enjoy seasonal healthy foods.  Clementines, pomegranates, pineapples, mangoes, oranges, clemntinesgrapefruits and apples are wonderful this time of year.  Keep them on the counter or in the front of the fridge where you can see them!

Move the goodies out of sight:  One of the biggest challenges of the season is a see-food diet, otherwise known as “if I see it, I eat it”. Studies show that when people keep food out of sight, they eat smaller amounts. Put the candy out of reach and move the cookies where you won’t have constant temptation.

Balance: if you are going to a holiday party in the evening, make an extra effort to eat well on other days.  Add in more vegetables, fruits, beans, whole grains, etc. and move more, too!  A piece of chocolate cake one day or one big holiday meal won’t make or break a diet, but daily treats do add up.

Choose what you’ll most enjoy: It’s a given that you’re going to have some special foods this holiday season. Can’t live without Aunt Sarah’s apple pie? Then plan to have some. Scope out your options before you dig in, and target things you enjoy most. Skip on the foods you can get any day.

Savor your favorites:  When you eat, really eat!   When we are really tasting our food (rather than inhaling something while talking and multitasking) food tastes much better, we’re more satisfied and full quicker.baked bananas

Fill your table with fruit and veggie dishes: Have your holiday meals feature seasonal vegetables, such as sweet potatoes, collards, green beans, or even sauteed celery in chestnut sauce! How about Fresh Cranberry relish vs the stuff in the can? Add in bean or veggie soups.  Make roasted chestnuts as a snack. Have a fruit inspired dessert, like baked apples, poached pears, sautéed or baked bananas, etc.

Skip the alcohol, or limit it to a drink or two.   Not only does it have a lot of calories, but once you’ve had a few, it’s easier to indulge on other foods.

It’s not all about the food… Honest! How else can you treat yourself? A massage? A hot bath? 15 minutes of quiet time with a good book? Having tea with an old friend? Plan in a variety of ways to relax

Get moving! Exercise is a great way to improve mood, reduce stress levels, and burn calories, too.  Head out at lunchtime for a short walk, check out the holiday lights in the evening, start a new family tradition and do something active at family events, dance at party functions, or make a habit of hitting the gym.  You don’t have to wait until January for healthy resolutions.

Harris Whole Health offers individual sessions, family sessions and group classes to help people eat healthier and feel better! Cheryl works with people to feel and look their best with a range of specialties, including Celiac Disease, food allergies, pregnancy, breastfeeding, vegetarian and vegan diets, preventing diseases and “whole foods” eating. Let’s get you on your way to achieving your goals. For an appointment with Cheryl Harris, Registered Dietitian and Nutritionist, please click here, email or call 571-271-8742.