Thanksgiving Roundup

Here’s a list of information from many major brands of turkey. This list was last updated on Nov  2016. Please note: NONE of the brands contain gluten in their plain, unstuffed turkeys. Some hams DO contain gluten, and so does holiday Tofurky.Please let me know if there are any broken links!

Thanksgiving tips, tricks and a ton of recipes HERE

General turkey tips:

  • Fresh, plain turkeys that are not stuffed are naturally gluten free
  • All regular stuffed turkeys contain gluten, even if you don’t eat the stuffing.
  • Check the gravy/seasoning packets very carefully. Some are g-free, but some are not.

Turkey/Ham/etc.:

Aaron’s Best
Shipped Kosher turkey, goose, duck, etc. WITH GF stuffings (buckwheat, quinoa or rice). Pricey, but wow!
Here’s their product list.

Butterball
800-288-8372
http://www.butterball.com/

D’artagnan
(800) 327-8246
“All of our raw products are Gluten free..” via email,

Empire Kosher Poultry
717-436-5921

Esskay and Mash Hams
1800-638-7350
“Esskay and Mash hams gluten free.” Via email, November 2011.

Honeybaked Ham

http://www.honeybaked.com/

Per website, Nov 2014 “Please note: You are now free to enjoy any of our signature meats (HoneyBaked Ham, Sliced & Glazed Turkey, Hickory Boneless Ham) without wheat gluten!”

Honeysuckle White

316 -683-4691
Honeysuckle White Turkeys are GF, but some of their other products have gluten.  A list of products that DO have gluten here. All other products are GF, according to the manufacturer. Updated Nov 2014

Hormel Foods
1-800-523-4635
Gluten-free list includes turkey products and ham, too. (updated Nov 2014)

Jennie-O
800-523-4635
Listing of all GF products

Manor House (Safeway brand)
877-723-3929

“The Safeway Brand Holiday Turkeys, fresh or frozen are Gluten Free.”

Perdue
800-473-7383
Are your products gluten free? “Yes. Many PERDUE® products are free of gluten. Perdue chickens, chicken parts and turkeys are all gluten-free. These are sold fresh, as well as frozen, and some are flavored with seasonings.”

Plainville Farms

http://www.plainvillefarms.com

800-724-0206
“Yes, our turkey is gluten free and casein free. However, our turkey gravy and our homestyle dressing contain wheat.” Nov 2013

Shadybrook Farms
1-888-723-4468
The majority of Shady Brook Farms® products do not contain Gluten. However, the following list of products do contain Gluten:
While some Tofurky products are now certified gluten-free, holiday tofurky products are wheat based. (updated Nov 3 2014)

Wellshire Farms
(856) 769-8933

Wellshire Farms’ website labels each product for the presence of gluten, casein, and a range of allergens. Some hams DO contain gluten.

Gravy:

Trader Joe’s, Mc Cormick and Whole Foods have gluten-free gravies.

* Disclaimer: This information is based on websites, email and telephone correspondence and is intended for informational purposes only and not as medical advice. Harris Whole Health is not responsible for any changes in ingredient lists, and always recommends double checking all labels.*

Harris Whole Health offers individual sessions, family sessions and classes in Fairfax and Alexandria, VA to help people eat healthier and feel better! Whether you are dealing with Celiac Disease, food allergies, picky eaters, chronic illness, or if you just want to improve your diet, Cheryl can help you achieve your goals. For an appointment with Cheryl Harris, Registered Dietitian and Nutritionist, click here or call 571-271-8742.

 

 

 

Breakfast Basics-GF Sept 08

As many of us head back to school or work, it’s a good time to start thinking about getting a healthy breakfast to start the day.  We need energy to study, work, and play!  Many studies have shown improvements in concentration and learning for children who eat breakfast, and starting the day with a healthy breakfast helps adults, too.  There are great options from both the regular grocery store and specialty products.

Some mainstream breakfast options are naturally gluten free, like Rice Chex, Cream of Rice, most kinds of yogurt, cottage cheese and fruit, even plain grits!  Sprinkle in a spoon or two of ground flax seed to get in a little extra fiber.  Or, get creative with eggs: scrambled eggs, omelets, huevos rancheros, or even hard boiled for an on the go breakfast.  Many kinds of breakfast meats, like sausage or bacon are also GF.

More and more cereal companies have special gluten free versions of the usual suspects.  Perky’s has Perky Os and Nutty Flax and Enjoy Life has a bunch of cereals and granolas.  As a plus, these cereals are fortified with vitamins.  EnviroKidz has some for children of all ages, like Gorilla Munch and Koala Kids, and these are in most local supermarkets.  And, of course, more stores sell GF bagels, muffins, scones, or other sweet breakfast treats.

As the days get cooler, hot cereals are a great way to start the day with fiber and whole grains.  Most GF grains cook up nicely as hot cereals, like kasha (buckwheat), millet, amaranth, teff, etc.  It’s easy to make a big pot and have them all week long. Bob’s Red Mill has a few nice options, like Mighty Tasty Hot Cereal. Don’t forget about GF certified oatmeal, which can be found at specialty stores or online.

You can also think beyond usual breakfast foods for a change of pace.  Soups or any kind of leftovers work well, and you’re only limited by your imagination!

GF Classes in Alexandria, VA:

The Art of Living GF

How, why and when to go gluten free
Saturday, October 4th
11:00-12:30

  • Sorting out the facts from common myths
  • All you ever wanted to know about label reading
  • Foods to avoid, cross contamination and hidden gluten
  • Books, resources, samples, and much more!

This is great for people who are familiar with the basics but still have some questions.  It’s also a great opportunity to educate family and friends to support you better!

School Meals:

Do you have a child with Celiac Disease?  American Celiac Disease Alliance just put out new information on school meals for children with Celiac Disease.  This is a great source of information on the Americans with Disabilities Act, 504 plans, and how they relate to CD.  For more info, please contact info@americanceliac.org

Seasonal grilled veggies:

As the weather gets a little cooler, it’s a great time to add vegetables onto the grill!  Make or buy kebabs with yellow squash, zucchini, mushrooms, red peppers and onions.  Or, use sliced of eggplant.  Drizzle with a small amount of oil and sprinkle with salt and pepper, and grill until done.   Simple and delicious!  You can also grill corn.

Harris Whole Health offers individual sessions, family sessions and group classes to help people eat healthier and feel better! Whether you are dealing with Celiac Disease, food allergies, picky eaters, children on the Autistic spectrum, chronic illness, or if you just want to feel and look better, Cheryl can help you achieve your goals. For an appointment with Cheryl Harris, Registered Dietitian and Nutritionist, please click here or call 571-271-8742.

GF Summertime–August 08

Since it’s summer time, this will be a mini newsletter with tidbits from around the web:

Gluten free news:

There’s new research by Dr. Fasano on where and how gluten causes damage in the intestines of people with Celiac Disease.  Here’s an article summarizing the findings.

The rules, they are a changin’

In the past, traveling abroad poses some challenges, since many countries follow guidelines known as the Codex Alimentarius, which defines under 200ppm as gluten free (most experts in this country recommend under 20 ppm).  However, it’s been reported that they’ve decided to lower their limit to 20 ppm.

Canada has become more proactive as well, and has announced new proposed regulations that all gluten sources must be labeled.

Speaking of the new limit, the official ruling on what can, and can’t, be labeled GF in the US is due out in August, 2008, so stay tuned!  However, unlike Canada and abroad, in the US the new ruling is ONLY voluntary.  Essentially, if a company wants to label something as GF, they must comply with the rules, but most of our food supply will still not be required to have gluten information on the label.

Local Events:

The National Foundation for Celiac Awareness (NCFA) is hosting a special Celiac Awareness Night on Saturday, August 16th for a game against the Colorado Rockies.

Triumph Dining is giving away their dining cards.  But it gets even better!  If enough people take them up on it, they’ll donate to a Celiac related charity.

Good news for multi-allergic chocolate lovers!  Enjoy life has new gluten/dairy/soy/nut free chocolate bars that will be at Whole Foods in August. There’s even a crispy rice bar!

Recipe and info round-up:

We’re seeing GF recipes in the mainstream more and more!  Emeril had a recent episode, with recipes that are gluten free, dairy free, egg free and nut free!  The included a brownie, wraps and more.

A local teen with Celiac Disease, Mike Perlman, has a GF cookbook out called Cookies for Breakfast. While perhaps this is not the healthiest cookbook out there, the proceeds go toward the Juvenile Diabetes and Celiac Disease research.  There was an article about in the Washington Post a few weeks back.

In the mood for some BBQ?  Here’s a bunch of gluten free recipes

The Gluten Free Goddess has a round up of her favorite gluten free products here.

Have a great summer!

Harris Whole Health offers individual sessions, family sessions and group classes to help people eat healthier and feel better! Whether you are dealing with Celiac Disease, food allergies, picky eaters, children on the Autistic spectrum, chronic illness, or if you just want to feel and look better, Cheryl can help you achieve your goals. For an appointment with Cheryl Harris, Registered Dietitian and Nutritionist, please click here or call 571-271-8742.

Dining out GF–July 2008

Gluten free dining:

One of the most common question I hear from clients is about dining out.  Is it safe?  Where can you go?  How do you KNOW they’re taking our health concerns seriously?

Last month’s newsletter focused on travel, and whether you’re close to home or on a trip, eating out with food restrictions requires some planning for a safe and enjoyable meal.

A good place to start is with a restaurants with a GF menu, or one recommended by others on a gluten free diet.  For the Northern VA area, I’ve just posted a list of places either with a GF menu, or places that will accommodate the GF diet.  For DC, the DC Celiacs group has a great guide through the yahoo group.   Triumph Dining has a good national guide, Gluten Intolerance Group (GIG) has a national listing.  Alocal or national list serv is a good place to get great ideas, like the Silly Yak’s Yahoo site, the St John’s Celiac listserv, or the Delphi group.  Or, if you’re gluten and dairy free, GFCF Recipes is a great place to get thoughts.  When you’re traveling some place unfamiliar, you can do a google search for GF blogs, CSA chapters, or ROCK groups.   Or, just choose restaurants more likely to have GF options, like grills, sushi, East Indian and Thai.  If you can, look for a menu online or call ahead.

It’s a good idea to dine early and avoid the dinner rush so restaurants can take the time to understand and meet your needs.  When you arrive, explain your diet simply.  Explaining Celiac as an allergy is easier than a medical discussion, and it’s often better understood.  If you have a dining card, bring that along, too!  Once you’ve figured out a safe entree, make sure you discuss cross contamination, including:

  • changing gloves
  • using a separate cutting board, pans, utensils, etc.
  • a dedicated fryer
  • no glutenous garnishes or rolls!

Make sure that the server understands your needs.  If not, it may be necessary to speak to a manager or chef, or (when possible) to leave.  When your meal arrives, always double check with your server before you begin to eat.

Definitely discuss the diet, even if it’s a place you’ve gone before, and even at a place with a GF menu.  New staff may not be well trained, and menus are ALWAYS changing!  Just because those fries were safe last time doesn’t mean they are safe today.

If you have a good experience, be sure to thank staff and leave a nice tip!  Whether your experience is good or bad, you may consider writing a letter or emailing management.  Feedback is important, and you’re helping yourself and others have a good experience in the future.

Recipes:

So many summer time recipes are naturally gluten free and use the fresh fruits and vegetables in season!  There are a lot of great summertime salads, like fruit salads, bean salads,  or even pasta salads by substituting gluten free pasta.  You can do a sorbet, like this Simple Strawberry Sorbet, and smoothies are easy and perfect for summer.  How about blueberry corn pancakes, a summertime tomato salad, a quinoa black bean salad or an apple mint salad? Also, grilled veggies are a great edition to any cookout.

Here’s a list of summertime favorites from the Gluten Free Goddess, who always has tasty treats.

News:

Survey for parents of children with Celiac Disease:

The American Celiac Disease Alliance has an online survey on the availability of gluten-free lunches for school aged students with Celiac disease. The survey will help ACDA to work with parents so their children can have gluten-free meals during the upcoming (2008-2009) school year.

To complete the survey go to www.americanceliac.org/news.htm and click on `What’s for Lunch?”  The survey will remain open through Sunday, July 20, 2008.

Celiac Awareness Night at the Nationals:

The Washington Nationals and the National Foundation for Celiac Awarenss have partnered for a special game on August 16th.  There are more details here!

Harris Whole Health offers individual sessions, family sessions and group classes to help people eat healthier and feel better! Whether you are dealing with Celiac Disease, food allergies, picky eaters, children on the Autistic spectrum, chronic illness, or if you just want to feel and look better, Cheryl can help you achieve your goals. For an appointment with Cheryl Harris, Registered Dietitian and Nutritionist, please click here or call 571-271-8742.

Gluten Free on the Go–June 08

For many people, summertime is filled with picnics, outdoor adventures and travel. With a little planning, you can make sure to have fun and take care of your health, too.

Picnics and cookouts tend to work well for a gluten free diet. Most grilled foods, like burgers, hot dogs, chicken breasts, etc. are gluten free in the regular grocery store, so you can coordinate with your host and ask about any marinades, or just bring your own food to grill. For vegetarians, Portabella mushrooms and veggie skewers work well. If they’re grilling buns, marinated meat, or anything else ‘glutenous’ in the same area, bring along aluminum foil to wrap your food and keep it safe from cross contamination. Just bring along your own bun, or in a pinch, use a lettuce leaf as a wrapper. It helps to carry a few little packets of condiments, in case there aren’t squeeze bottles of mayo or mustard. Green salads, fruit salads and watermelon are usually on the menu, and don’t forget grilled corn as a yummy treat! Ice cream, popsicles and frozen fruit bars are often GF, though it’s important to check the label. Since these events are often potlucks, it’s easy to bring along a safe dish that you’ll enjoy.

For out of town travel, it helps to plan ahead. It’s a good idea to pack a few meals in a carry on bag, just in case your luggage gets lost or your flight gets delayed. Good options can include GF energy bars, tuna with a pull top, dry cereal, dried fruit and nuts, baby carrots, rice cake “sandwiches”, apples, fruit leather, a hard boiled egg, chocolate bars,”just add water” GF meals, etc. Remember, things with liquid aren’t a good idea because of the new security laws. You can also check this resource on dining options at airports nationwide to get an idea if there’s food you can grab and go.

No matter where you’re headed, you can get basic GF food nearby, even if you don’t have access to a kitchen. Almost every supermarket will carry some GF staples. Here’s a list to get you thinking:

  • Fruits
  • Veggies
  • Canned beans
  • Canned tuna
  • Yogurt
  • Cheese
  • Rice Chex
  • Cream of Rice
  • Nuts
  • Dinty Moore Stew
  • Sunflower Seeds
  • Microwave popcorn
  • Plain tortilla chips
  • Plain potato chips
  • Fruit leather
  • Corn tortillas
  • Dried fruit

If you’re going to be away for a while, you may want to order some GF specialty foods and have them shipped to your destination. And restaurants are getting into the act! There are many options from both national and local chains. Triumph Dining has a good national guide, Gluten Intolerance Group (GIG) has a national listing . Gluten Free Travel Site is a new site with reviews of places across the country. There’s even Bob & Ruth’s Gluten Free dining and travel club, which has GF travel getaways and newsletters. There are many websites with dining cards and I have a few of them listed here. You may also want to email the local Celiac association and find out where the locals go.

If you’re traveling abroad, that takes more planning. Here’s a link to an article with good tips

No matter what you love to do, go out and have a fabulous summer!

Local events:

  • The Northern VA CSA is hosting “Northern VA Celiac Forum” on Saturday, June 21, 2008 9-1pm at Inova Fairfax Hospital. There are more details here or contact Daniel at 571-289-5675

Local news:

Could it be? National’s Stadium is serving GF pretzels and GF beer!

Recipe:

This recipe is quick, easy, simple, tasty and nutritious. It’s one of my favorites for breakfast or a quick snack. Enjoy!

Banana Skillet Bread

Ingredients

1 cup teff
1 cup sorghum flour
1 T mesquite flour*
1Tablespoons +1 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
3/4 cup hazelnuts, brazil nuts, pecans or walnuts
pinch of salt

Wet:
2 uber ripe bananas
1 level tablespoon +1 teaspoon ground flax seeds
2/3 cup maple syrup
1/2 cup coconut oil
1/2 teaspoon maple extract
1 teaspoon vanilla or almond extract
1/3 cup sparkling (bubbly) water, ‘milk’, or juice

Grease a 10 inch cast iron skillet with coconut oil. Preheat oven to 350.

Thoroughly mix dry ingredients together. Dump wet ingredients (not water) in a blender. Let it roll until well blended. In my vitamix, that takes less than a minute. I would assume an ordinary blender would take a few minutes. Then add in water and add wet to dry, mix until well everything is well combined, but don’t overmix (i.e. no more dry stuff, but no need for a workout)

Bake for 30 minutes or until top turns a beautiful golden brown. Cool on a drying rack 5 minute, then turn out.

* if you don’t have access to mesquite flour, you can just use a whole cup of sorghum or teff, and increase the amount of maple extract to 1 teaspoon, or add in an extra pinch of cinnamon to give more flavor.

~from Cheryl’s kitchen ©2007

Harris Whole Health offers individual sessions, family sessions and group classes to help people eat healthier and feel better! Whether you are dealing with Celiac Disease, food allergies, picky eaters, children on the Autistic spectrum, chronic illness, or if you just want to feel and look better, Cheryl can help you achieve your goals. For an appointment with Cheryl Harris, Registered Dietitian and Nutritionist, please click here or call 571-271-8742.

Something in Season: May newsletter

Something in Season
Classes
Summer or spring rolls
Make your voice heard!
NoVA/DC/MD resource page

Great news! There are thousands of new places opening up across the country with delicious, healthy, fresh gluten free food. It’s even better than what you can get at the usual supermarket or even at health food stores. You don’t have to read any labels, call the manufacturer. Does it sound too good to be true? Well, Farmer’s Markets are about to open up across the country. Most open in May or June.

Farmer’s Markets are a fabulous place to get gluten free and allergen free foods. Yes, many have a booth with baked goods or soups, but aside from that, it’s a paradise of gluten free goodness.

Benefits of shopping at the Farmer’s Market

  • Fresh produce and meat-most fruits and vegetables are picked that day
  • Support for local farmers
  • Few or fewer pesticides on fruits and vegetables. A plum shipped from Chile need a lot of pesticides to keep it lovely even after traveling thousands of miles.
  • Better taste! There’s nothing that compares to the taste of a freshly picked tomato, peach, or apple.
  • The “manufacturer” is usually right in front of you, so if you have questions about how something is made or grown, just ask!

Also, another great option are CSAs (Community Supported Agriculture)
Here are some links to get information on Farmer’s Markets in your area:
Nationwide listing of USDA Farmer’s Markets
Nationwide listing that includes markets, farms, farm stands, CSAs etc.

Classes:

GF and Healthy

Saturday, May 31st, 2008
11:00-1:00

  • Different whole grains how to use them
  • Many GF ways to get fiber
  • Healthy fats
  • Glycemic load and foods

This class is 2 hours and we will be making summer rolls with Thai dipping sauce and spiced black rice pudding (yum!!!)

Recipes:
Summer or Spring rolls:
Spring is here, and summer is just around the corner, so this is a perfect time for these! You can fill them with any vegetable, and if you wish, you can include cooked meat or shrimp. Personally, I prefer just veggies.

Children love these, and often are having too much fun dipping to realize they’re getting their veggies. Rice paper is easy to work with once you get the hang of it.

Ingredients:
12 lettuce leaves
2 cups shredded carrots
about 1/3 napa cabbage, sliced very thinly
1/2 yellow, red or orange pepper, sliced thinly
1 cup bean sprouts
1/3 cup mint leaves
1/3 cup cilantro or basil

15 rice paper wraps (a few extra in case of mistakes)
Have a large dish of warm water and all of your veggies arranged. Put the rice paper in warm water. Grab a piece of lettuce. Arrange the rice paper on the plate. Put down the lettuce leaf and a small handful of the “filler” veggies. Roll up! If the paper rips, you can double wrap.

It takes a few tries to get the hang of it, and often less is more. Don’t overstuff! For a crash course, you can always come to my GF and healthy class in Alexandria, VA.

Serve with Thai dipping sauce or peanut sauce.

Make your voice heard!!!

Congress is considering HConRes 70, a bill to increase awareness of Celiac Disease, designate a Celiac Awareness month, provide money for research and support the provision of services by a Registered Dietitian. This bill is supported by the American Celiac Disease Alliance, the American Dietetic Association, the American Gastroenterology Association, the American Osteopathic Association and more. For more information and to contact your representative, go to http://www.americanceliac.org/advocacy.htm

NoVA/DC/MD resource page:

I’ve added a page of resources for this area, including nearby events, stores with GF lists, and local support group information. If you have an event you’d like listed, please drop me a line.

Harris Whole Health offers individual sessions, family sessions and group classes to help people eat healthier and feel better! Whether you are dealing with Celiac Disease, food allergies, picky eaters, children on the Autistic spectrum, chronic illness, or if you just want to feel and look better, Cheryl can help you achieve your goals. For an appointment with Cheryl Harris, Registered Dietitian and Nutritionist, please click here or call 571-271-8742.

Flax: GF Newsletter April 08

Flax: Sprinkle you way to a healthier day!

Flax seeds have gotten a lot of good press lately because they contain omega 3 fatty acids, which are anti-inflammatory and important for good health. But they’re particularly good for gluten free folks because they add much needed fiber to our diets, and also add a nutty flavor and moistness to gluten free baked goods.

Health benefits:
These little seeds are multipurpose wonders. We benefit from the fatty acids, the lignans they contain, and the fiber, too.

Flax seeds and flax oil are great sources of alpha linolenic acid (ALA) which is an omega 3 fatty acid. Studies have linked ALA and its benefits for high blood pressure, heart disease, for bone health, etc. Studies have been very positive about flaxseed’s role in reducing cholesterol levels and even managing blood sugars in diabetics. Also, our bodies can convert ALA it into eicosapentoaenoic acid (EPA), which is the form of omega 3 fatty acids found in fish oil.

Flax seeds also contain lignans, and studies have suggested they may be protective in both breast and prostate cancers.

Don’t forget about the fiber! One of the most common complaints I hear is that when people go gluten free, they’re just not regular anymore. Flax seeds are also a great source of fiber, which helps with constipation.

How to use flax seeds and flax oil
You’ve got your pick of brown or golden flax seeds, which have the same nutritional value. Flax seeds are sold whole and ground. Whole seeds will most definitely keep you regular (maybe more than you want them to) but you’ll miss out on all of the fatty acids and lignins, so it’s much more beneficial eat them milled or ground. They can be purchased pre-ground, or you can do it yourself in a coffee or spice grinder. Once the flax seeds are ground, they must be kept refrigerated, frozen or used quickly, or they will go rancid.

You can add flax seeds to many baked goods. Many GF recipes include flax seeds for their nutty moistness. A flax seed goop (a technical term) can be made from boiling flax seeds and water and used as an egg replacer. Flax seeds work well sprinkled on salads, in smoothies, or on cereal.

Flax seed oil is great when you’re not using heat. So it’s perfect for making a salad dressing, or tossing veggies that are not going to be heated. But when it’s heated, not only are the helpful parts lost, harmful compounds are formed.

Everything in moderation

Some is good, so more is better, right? Like most foods, flax should be added into the diet in moderation. Like all fiber sources, it’s best to gradually increase the amount of flax seed. There is also some suggestions in animal studies that high doses of flax (more than 4 tablespoons a day) may be harmful, so if you are pregnant and eat a lot of flax, have a chat with your doctor.

So I bet you’re interesting in recipes using flax seeds, right? Well, many of the entries for the GF Healthy Recipe Contest include flax seed, such as the Applesauce Teff Cake , Pumpkin Spice Muffins, Fluffy Puffy Pancakes and many others. Speaking of the recipe contest…

Winners of the Healthy (or healthier) Recipe Contest!

Thanks so much to everyone who submitted and voted for recipes. Thanks also to the people who generously donated the prizes, and to my husband for his patience in teaching me how to post the recipes. We had 52 submissions, including a wide range of cooking and baking styles. The winners are (drumroll please!)

Baked goods: a big reusable tote bag of goodies from Bob’s Red Mill

WINNER: Chocolate Coconut Amaranth Bread(GF, DF, EF, SF) By Christel King

Dessert: 2 great new cookbooks (signed!) from Susan O’Brien: Gluten Free, Sugar Free Cooking and Gluten free Vegan Cookbook

WINNER: Chocolate Cake Brownie (GF, DF) By: Mireille Cote

Main meal: goodies from Heartland’s Finest

WINNER:Chicken With Garlic, Pasta and Chard (GF,DF, EF, SF) By:Karen Eidson

Kid friendly: $50 gift certificate from Allergy Grocer

WINNER:GFCFEFSF Whipped Cream(GF, DF, EF, SF) By Christel King

Allergy friendly: a big box of products from Enjoy Life and Perky’s

WINNER: Applesauce Teff Cake (GF, DF, EF, SF, nuts optional) By Robin Reed

I’m leaving the recipes up so that people can keep tasting, rating and commenting.

Upcoming classes:

GF and Healthy
Whole grains, fiber, healthy fats and more
Saturday, May 31st
11:00-1:00

We will be making summer rolls!

For more info or to register click here.

Springtime Special:

Get 10% off an initial nutrition session when you mention this deal!

I spy:

Gluten free Rice Chex? Could it be? Yes, General Mills has opted to change the formula from barley malt to other sweeteners. This is the first switch for a big corporation to accommodate our GF world and the thought is that if sales go up, others will follow suit. I’ve seen them at the Giant in Hayfield, it says GF right on the box! However, old ones may still be on the shelf, so double check the labels as always to be sure.

GF Passover foods: for a detailed description, check out last month’s newsletter. And I’ll see you next to the gluten, dairy and soy free chocolate chips…

Happy Spring,

Cheryl

Harris Whole Health offers individual sessions, family sessions and group classes to help people eat healthier and feel better! Whether you are dealing with Celiac Disease, food allergies, picky eaters, children on the Autistic spectrum, chronic illness, or if you just want to feel and look better, Cheryl can help you achieve your goals. For an appointment with Cheryl Harris, Registered Dietitian and Nutritionist, please click here or call 571-271-8742.

GF Foods to Celebrate: March 08

Passover foods: Great options for everyone who is GF
Classes
GF Health Recipe Contest update

The Passover aisle can be a great source of GF foods, no matter holiday you celebrate.

Passover isn’t here until mid-April, but many of the products are already starting to appear in grocery stores. Not all Passover foods are gluten free, but many are, and there’s a much wider selection than usual at the grocery store. This can be a good time to stock up on GF cakes and mixes, cookies, “bread” crumbs and supplies like potato starch. As an added bonus for people with multiple restrictions, most Kosher for Passover products contain no corn or soy products, and there are always a variety of dairy free foods, too.

In a nutshell, the basic rule of foods for Passover is no leavened foods, which eliminates normal breads, cakes etc. Matzo, (an unleavened bread usually made from wheat) is eaten, but aside from Matzo and matzo meal, (also potentially listed as cake meal or farfel) products are gluten free. Or, if you find products labeled “non-gebrok or gebroktz or grebrochts” (or another spelling variation) they’re non-grain containing and therefore safe. Often Kosher for Passover products and cakes are made of potato flour or nut meals rather than wheat.

  • As always in the GF world, read labels carefully. Kosher and Kosher for Passover are two different things entirely. Kosher for Passover foods will be labeled “May be used for Passover” or have a symbol that says OUP. I have often seen “regular” Kosher foods in the Passover section at grocery stores, so please do check the labels for gluten containing ingredients.
  • Keep in mind that some of the foods are imported from other countries, and therefore not under US labeling laws. So a label must still say matzo, but may not say wheat explicitly or have the disclaimer stating that it contains wheat.
  • From a gluten free perspective, possibly the best part of Passover is AFTER Passover, when all of the great GF goodies are on sale! Passover ends April 29th, so mark your calendars, because the word has gotten out in GF circles.

Here’s a link to the GF products from Manishewitz:

For people who DO celebrate the actual holiday of Passover, not just the GF food, one of the best resources around is GF by the Bay blog, which is often a wealth of information.
Here are a few other good sites: Recipezaar
I am Gluten Free Blog
GFCF Recipe List and click on holidays. There are quite a few Jewish holiday recipes, and they are all gluten and dairy free.
Jewish Celiacs has a variety of recipes and other sources of info.

You can also buy GF oat matzoh. The brand only brand I’ve seen is Shmura Oat Matzah
Back when you really couldn’t get GF prepared foods in the regular grocery store, this was a much bigger deal. But it’s still nice to have an expanded selection, and nicest of all is AFTER Passover, when all of the products are on sale.

Upcoming Classes in Alexandria, VA:

Baking and Cooking with Gluten Free Grains

Saturday, March 29th, 2008, 11:00-1:00

*Different grains how to use them
* Tips and strategies for tasty baked goods
* Avoiding common mistakes
* GF whole grains and how to use them in main meals
This class is 2 hours and will include a demo and tasting for a GF grain dish. The cost is $25 per person or two for $40

The Art of Living GF

Saturday, April 26, 11-12:30

*All you ever wanted to know about label reading
*Foods to enjoy and where to find them
*Foods to avoid, cross contamination and hidden gluten
*Survival tips for the first few weeks.
*Where to get support-local and online groups, websites, books

Workshops taught by Cheryl Harris, Nutritionist & Registered Dietitian. There will be tasty goodies and samples! PRE-REGISTRATION REQUIRED. Register here or contact Cheryl at Cheryl@harriswholehealth.com or 571-271-8742 with questions.

It’s voting time…GF Healthy Recipe Contest:

I received 52 healthy (or healthier) GF recipes, and they’re all posted on my website. There’s a huge variety, from breakfasts, to sides, to main meals, to desserts. All are GF, but there are also options for people who are juggling multiple allergies, on a diabetic diet, GFCF or vegan, too. The ones I’ve made so far have been delicious! Check them out and vote for your favorites. http://www.harriswholehealth.com/recipe-contest

Winners will be announced in April.

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Local events:
The National Foundation for Celiac Awareness is hosting its annual Cooking Spree
Friday April 11, 2008
7:30-10:30pm
Hyatt Regency Bethesda
7400 Wisconsin Avenue
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DC Metro Area ROCK SPRING EGG HUNT & Gluten Free Pot Luck Lunch
April 5th, Owen Brown Community Center, Columbia MD 21045
For more info, please see the event flyer
Pre-registration required. Contact Linda Hickman or via phone 410-290-5224

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Maryland Cel-Kids & the Baltimore Area Celiac Support Group present:
Eating Gluten-Free at School and at College
Sunday, April 13, 2008
2:00 – 4:00 p.m. Event details
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Harris Whole Health offers individual sessions, family sessions and group classes to help people eat healthier and feel better! Whether you are dealing with Celiac Disease, food allergies, picky eaters, children on the Autistic spectrum, chronic illness, or if you just want to feel and look better, Cheryl can help you achieve your goals. For an appointment with Cheryl Harris, Registered Dietitian and Nutritionist, please click here or call 571-271-8742.

Spread GF Sunshine: Feb 08

Spread a little sunshine this winter…All about Vitamin D

In the winter months, most of us aren’t getting much sunlight. It’s still dark when we leave our houses and often dark by the time we get home. When we go outside, we’re usually bundled up from head to toe. Not only does this tend to affect mood, but we also depend on sunlight as a source of Vitamin D. Even if someone were to go out dancing in the snow in a bathing suit in the winter months, in many areas it’s still impossible to get all of the vitamin D needed for good health. Skin pigmentation, age, sunscreen, and geographic location all play a role in determining how much vitamin D the body produces from sunlight.

When people think of vitamin D deficiency, they tend to think of rickets, or the bowed legs seen in children. Actually, the problem is much more widespread and affects most systems in the body. Researchers are increasingly learning that most people have Vitamin D levels are below the ideal, and this seems even more common in people avoiding gluten for various reasons. Recent studies are reinforcing the importance of vitamin D, showing that deficiency can cause joint pain and bone weakness, and lower vitamin D levels are linked to higher rates of cancer, Multiple Sclerosis, increased fall rates, lowered immune function, depression and more.

Vitamin D is especially important to people with Celiac disease, gluten intolerance and people following a gluten free/casein free (GFCF diet). Celiac disease often causes great damage to the small intestine, and the small intestine is where our bodies absorb vitamin D. Osteoporosis and osteopenia are frequently seen in Celiac patients, and Vitamin D is an essential component to both calcium absorption and the formation of healthy bones. Additionally, untreated Celiac disease also may lead to fat malabsorbtion, and vitamin D is a fat soluble vitamin.

Fortified milk and milk products are one of the few commonly eaten food sources of vitamin D. However, many gluten free folks are lactose intolerant, or avoid dairy products due to following a gluten free, casein free (GFCF) diet. The NIH just released a statement about a study showing that autistic boys tend to have thinner bones.So regardless of why you are GF, it is important to speak to your doctor and have your vitamin D levels tested.

There are several ways to get vitamin D in the winter months:

  • Eat vitamin D rich foods: fortified dairy, cod liver oil or other fatty fish, are good sources. For vegetarians or vegans, there are small amounts found in eggs, or some in mushrooms exposed to UV light.
  • Take vitamin D supplements: Many doctors recommend high doses of vitamin D initially to normalize levels in people who are deficient, but since Vitamin D is fat soluble and stored in the body, too much can be dangerous. It’s important to have a doctor monitor your levels.
  • Take a vacation to somewhere warm and sunny: totally self explanatory, and my personal favorite way of getting vitamin D. However, this doesn’t mean that you need to sunbathe all day. Experts say that15-20 minutes of sun in most warm areas 3-4 times a week is usually all that is needed. However, this does differ by season and latitude.

Healthy (or healthier) GF recipe contest:

We’ve had a lot of great entries, and you can still submit your recipe until Feb 20th! Click here for more details. There are fabulous prizes.

Even if you aren’t into creating your own recipes, try some of the recipes submitted, rate them and leave comments to let us all learn from your experimentation.

Classes:

The Art of Living Gluten Free

Saturday, February 9th, 11:00-12:30

Food and mood: Eat better, feel better!

Saturday, March 8th, 11:00-12:30

Baking and Cooking Gluten Free

Saturday, March 29nd, 11:00-1:00

Each class is taught by Cheryl Harris, MPH, RD and is held in Alexandria, VA. For more information or to register, see the classes page.

Healthy GF fare on the web:

January has been a great month for GF and healthy blogging. Here are a few that caught my eye:
Ginger Lemon Girl has been exploring GF, sugar free and healthier living.

Brenda at Book of Yum has a gorgeous looking Buckwheat Gallette and other great recipes.

Gluten free by the Bay always has great recipes. Check out the Spicy Black Eyed Peas and Collard Greens recipe!

Gluten Free Mommy has a wonderful primer on GF flours for people who
like to color outside the lines and mix it up a little.

A little love for Valentine’s Day:

Here are some suggestions from AllergyMoms.com for a safe Valentine’s Day party for children. The same advice works well for children who are gluten free.


Harris Whole Health offers individual sessions, family sessions and group classes to help people eat healthier and feel better! Whether you are dealing with Celiac Disease, food allergies, picky eaters, children on the Autistic spectrum, chronic illness, or if you just want to feel and look better, Cheryl can help you achieve your goals. For an appointment with Cheryl Harris, Registered Dietitian and Nutritionist, please click here or call 571-271-8742.

Off to a Great GF New Year–January 08

Healthy Eating
Classes
Recipe Contest
Recipes

Start the New Year Off Right!

Many of us see the New Year as a great time to make changes and improve our health. It’s a good time to look at your diet and lifestyle, and see what you can do to feel better and be healthier, too.

Going gluten free can be a big turning point to eating healthier. Many people are amazed to realize the impact that diet has on how they feel! All of a sudden, people need to start reading labels, and many begin to wonder why there are all of these ingredients they can’t pronounce and why high fructose corn syrup seems to be in everything. Or maybe after years of eating anything and staying slim, the pounds have started creeping upward. No matter what your reason, let this be the year you improve your diet.

Are you getting the nutrients you need?

Nutrition is important for everyone, but particularly for people who have food restrictions. Years ago, the Food and Drug Administration realized that many people weren’t getting enough vitamins like folate and several other B vitamins, and iron. So they added a variety of nutrients to the foods supply in every day foods like flour, bread, pasta, cereal, etc. However, gluten free breads and cereals are considered specialty products, and very few are enriched with these vitamins. Not only that, but many gluten free breads are filled with things like tapioca, potato and cornstarch to give a light texture, and these foods have very few nutrients. So when people switch from eating regular packaged foods to eating gluten free processed foods, they don’t realize that they’re actually eating a lot fewer vitamins, minerals and fiber and usually more calories, too. Not only that, but many people with Celiac may be deficient in many vitamins because they have not been absorbing foods well for years, and may need more than the average person while they are healing.

Gluten free does not automatically mean good for you! Often in the beginning, people want to try anything that’s gluten free, and are just focusing on getting by. The focus is on finding replacements for old favorites and learning all of the new rules. That is definitely a great short-term strategy but it’s only the first step! The good news is that that many healthy foods are naturally gluten free, like fruits, veggies, beans, many whole grains, nuts, seeds, and plain fish and poultry.

Here are some suggestions to make your diet healthier:

  • Get whole grains in your diet. Try a whole grain hot cereal, brown rice bread, wild rice with dinner, or even quinoa pasta.
  • Try a new grain, or two or three! Amaranth, millet, quinoa, sorghum and teff are getting easier to find locally and online.
  • Have fruit or vegetable with every meal-5-9 a day. That can be as easy as an orange with breakfast, a salad with lunch, dried fruit for snack and 2 servings of veggies along with dinner.
  • Drink your water! 6-8 glasses a day are important to stay hydrated.
  • Find a way to reduce stress: acupuncture, meditation, deep breathing, talking to a friend, dancing, walking the dog, whatever works for you. I consider this part of good nutrition because most people don’t reach for Brussels sprouts when they get stressed.

Classes:

Gluten Free and Healthy!
Thursday, January 17th, 2008
6:30-8:00 pm

The Art of Living Gluten Free
Saturday, February 9th, 2008
11:00-12:30

Food and mood: Eat better, feel better!
Saturday, March 8th, 2008
11:00-12:30
Click for class details and registration.

Healthy recipe contest:

So many people want to eat healthier, but need recipes to get started. So during the month of January, email me your favorite healthy recipes, and people will rate them during February. The recipe with the highest average rating in each category will win prizes donated from places such as Allergy Grocer, Enjoy Life, Heartland’s Finest and the new GF cookbooks from Susan O’Brien. They do need to be your recipes, or a recipe that you’ve changed to make gluten free, allergen friendly or healthier. Here are all the details.

There are different guidelines for what counts as healthy, and some disagreement among experts. But there is a lot of agreement, too, and so for the contest, we’ll define a healthy recipe as:

  • Featuring fruits, vegetables, beans, and nuts
  • Containing mostly whole grain flours (Amaranth, brown rice, millet, quinoa, sorghum, teff, wild rice) and limiting tapioca starch, potato starch and corn starch
  • Avoiding trans and animal fats (butter, cream, etc)
  • Containing limited amounts sugar (if any)
  • When possible, adding in great sources of fiber, like flax seeds, bran, mesquite, etc.
  • Favoring whole, unprocessed foods.

So let’s get cooking!

Here are some websites with many GF recipes featuring whole grains and fruits and veggies.

  • Bob’s Red Mill Features many gluten free and whole grain recipes. Search under “gluten free”
  • Dr. Weil has great healthy recipes listed. Most (not all) are GF
  • Eating Vegan: All recipes are GF, dairy free and egg free. Most are plant based and most are pretty healthy, too.
  • Health-e-Recipes from AICR (American Institute for Cancer Research). You can sign up for newsletters on their site, and you get weekly recipes in your inbox. Many (not all) are gluten free and dairy free. Many are quick and simple, use seasonal ingredients, and feature a lot of veggies.
  • Vegan, (almost entirely) gluten free cookbooks from Vitalita by Mark Foy. There are two free downloadable books. Even if you’re not vegan, it’s yummy! Vegan cookbooks are a great resource if you can’t eat dairy or eggs. http://vitalita.com/cookbooks.html
  • World’s Healthiest Foods: Good, basic healthy recipes. Most are gluten free, but you can check off the foods you want to avoid for a recipe search. http://whfoods.com/
  • 101 Recipes: Some are GF, some aren’t. There are many great soup and vegetarian recipes, and many feature veggies and whole grains.

I have other recipe sites and many let you search for lighter and healthier recipes. Do you have a favorite healthy recipe site that isn’t listed? Let me know!

Recipes:

Chocolate Banana “Pudding”

Looking for a way to add more fruit into your diet? This treat is quick and child friendly snack. I had reservations about mixing avocado and chocolate, but I got over it after one bite. I don’t remember where I first got the idea, but this is our version:

1 large (or 2 small) very ripe banana
2 small ripe avocados
1/3 cup cocoa powder
3-4 Tablespoons honey
1T vanilla extract (optional)
Chopped nuts, chocolate chips, cacao nibs or unsweetened coconut (optional)

Blend avocado, bananas and honey until smooth. Add in cocoa powder and vanilla extract and stir very well. Adjust the amount of cocoa or honey to your tastes. Sprinkle with nuts or other topping if desired. Enjoy immediately, or chill for an hour. It’s best when eaten soon after preparing.

On the prowl for recipes:

Quinoa and Black Bean Salad: If you’re new to quinoa or looking for a change, check out this recipe from Allrecipes .

Peanut butter Chocolate Chip Cookies: These whole grain teff beauties are from Leslie Cerier’s cookbook, Going Wild in the Kitchen. I highly recommend the hazelnut variation. They’re gluten, dairy, egg, and soy free, so even I can eat them!

Wishing you and your family another year of peace, joy, health and happiness,
Cheryl Harris, MPH, RD.

Harris Whole Health offers individual sessions, family sessions and group classes to help people eat healthier and feel better! Whether you are dealing with Celiac Disease, food allergies, picky eaters, children on the Autistic spectrum, chronic illness, or if you just want to feel and look better, Cheryl can help you achieve your goals. For an appointment with Cheryl Harris, Registered Dietitian and Nutritionist, please see www.harriswholehealth.com or call 571-271-8742.