Nourishing Your Body for Better Health

Topic: Classes

New Webinar Series on Celiac Disease

Check out my new LIVE webinar course series on Celiac disease:

  • Celiac Disease: What every RD Should Know
  • Gluten Free and Healthy
  • Gluten Sensitivity
  • A Happy, Healthy Pregnancy and Baby

CEUs available for RDs/DTRs

Back to School 2010–GF Newsletter

Gluten-free Breakfasts

By Cheryl Harris, MPH, RD

With back-to-school right around the corner, it’s time to think about breakfasts.  We’ve all heard it—breakfast is the most important meal of the day, and gets us off to a good start.  We need energy to study, work, and play!  Many studies have shown improvements in concentration and learning for children who eat breakfast, and starting the day with a healthy breakfast helps adults, too.  As a dietitian, I look for breakfasts that are high in fiber, have some protein, and contain limited sugar.  There are great options from both the regular grocery store and specialty products.

Some mainstream breakfast options are naturally gluten-free, like most kinds of Chex (not wheat Chex, of course!), most kinds of yogurt, cottage cheese and fruit, even plain grits!  Sprinkle in a spoon or two of ground flax seed to get in a little extra fiber.  Or, get creative with eggs: scrambled eggs, omelets, huevos rancheros, or even hard-boiled for an inexpensive, high protein on-the-go breakfast.   Smoothies are also a great way to get in some additional fruit in your diet, and most kids enjoy them, too.  Many kinds of breakfast meats, like sausage or bacon are also gluten-free.

As far as cold cereals go, nutritionally, Crunchy Flax, Whole O’s and Mesa Sunrise are among the best options because all are great sources of whole grains and fiber. And, of course, there are more and more gluten-free versions of the typical standards. EnviroKidz has some for children of all ages, like Gorilla Munch and Koala Kids, and these are in most local supermarkets.  And, of course, more stores sell gluten-free bagels, muffins, scones, or other sweet breakfast treats.

Looking ahead to chilly mornings, hot cereals are a great way to start the day with fiber and whole grains.  Most gluten-free grains cook up nicely as hot cereals. My personal favorite is millet, but kasha (buckwheat), quinoa flakes, amaranth, teff, etc. work well, too.  It’s easy to make a big pot and have them all week long.  Bob’s Red Mill has a few nice options, like Mighty Tasty Hot Cereal. Don’t forget about certified gluten-free oatmeal, which can be found at specialty stores or online.

You can also think beyond usual breakfast foods for a change of pace.  Soups or any kind of leftovers work well, and you’re only limited by your imagination!

Back-to-School Resources from Around the Web

American Celiac Disease Alliance has a fabulous section on back-to-school, with sample menus, doctor’s letters, info on 504 plans and more.

Celiac About.com has a really nice compilation on back-to-school tips.

Celiac Sprue Association has a detailed section on back-to-school with tips for parents, teachers, students and more.

Classes:

Living and Loving a Gluten-Free Diet

Saturday, Oct 16th, 2010
11:00-12:30

•    Celiac disease, gluten sensitivity and the importance of proper testing
•    All you ever wanted to know about label reading
•    Foods to avoid, cross contamination and hidden gluten
•    Sorting out the facts from common myths

This is great for people who are familiar with some of the basics but still have some questions.  It’s also a great opportunity to educate family and friends so they can support you better!

For more information, see http://www.harriswholehealth.com/services

Local Events:

DC Celiacs

Next Meeting Date: Saturday, September 11, 2010, 2:00–4:00 pm

Meeting Topic: Educating for Life.
Speaker: John Libonati, Glutenfreeworks.com

Vendor: Everybody Eats ( www.everybodyeats-inc.com )

Location: Bethesda Central Library
7400 Arlington Rd, Bethesda, MD 20814
240-777-0970, (TTY: 301-657-0840)
Meeting room is to the left just after you enter the library doors, right before the parking kiosk.

Parking is available at the library.
Remember to enter your parking space number in the machine in the entryway, to avoid getting a ticket!
www.montgomerycountymd.gov/Apps/Libraries/branchinfo/be.asp

Harris Whole Health offers individual sessions, family sessions and group classes to help people eat healthier and feel better!  Cheryl works with people to feel and look their best with a range of specialties, including Celiac Disease, food allergies, pregnancy, breastfeeding, vegetarian and vegan diets, preventing diseases and “whole foods” eating.  Let’s get you on your way to achieving your goals. For an appointment with Cheryl Harris, Registered Dietitian and Nutritionist, please click here to email or call 571-271-8742.

New Classes Announced

Living and Loving a Gluten free Diet

Saturday, Jan 16th, 11-12:30

It’s great for people who know the basics but still have questions on
label reading, cross contamination, resources, etc. Or maybe there are
a few things you’ve heard and aren’t sure about. It’s also a way of
educating a significant other or family member so they can help
support you better in your GF journey!

* Celiac disease, gluten sensitivity and the importance of testing
* All you ever wanted to know about label reading
* Foods to avoid, cross contamination and hidden gluten
* Sorting out the facts from common myths
* Where to get support-local and online groups, websites, books

Gluten free and Healthy

Saturday, Feb 6th, 2010

11-1 pm

We’ll talk about:

  • Different gluten free whole grains and flours and how to use them
  • Many GF ways to get fiber
  • Easy ways to make meals and baked goods healthier
  • Ways to make sure you’re getting the nutrients you need
  • and much more!

This class is 2 hours and we will be making a delicious quinoa dish

The cost is $25 per person or two for $40. *

*if you have a flexible spending account (FSA), I can provide you with a receipt for the class, which you can submit for reimbursement as a health expense.

To register, click here or or email Cheryl with questions or call 571-271-8742

Coming soon:

A new class schedule will be coming soon, but if there’s a class you’re interested in, please drop me a line!

Past classes have included Gluten Free and Healthy, Baking and Cooking Gluten Free, the Art of Living Gluten free and Eating to fight inflammation.

Are you getting the nutrients you need on a GF diet?


Classes:
Nutrients on a GF diet
Local news and events

Living and Loving a GF Diet

Saturday, Sept 26th 11:00-12:30

  • Celiac disease, gluten sensitivity and the importance of testing
  • All you ever wanted to know about label reading
  • Foods to avoid, cross contamination and hidden gluten
  • Sorting out the facts from common myths
  • Where to get support-local and online groups, websites, books

To register, see http://www.harriswholehealth.com/services The class cost is $20 per person, or bring a friend for 2 people for $35.

Are you getting the nutrients you need on a gluten free diet?

When people start off on a gluten free diet, step one is figuring a way to take out all the gluten, and get adjusted to this new way of living and eating.  But as life starts to ease back to normal, it’s important to take the second step and eat a diet with all of the nutrients you need to feel better, allow your intestines to heal, and live well.

Years ago, studies showed that many people weren’t getting enough iron and B vitamins, so the US government decided to fortify our breads, cereals, etc.  However, GF foods are considered specialty foods, and there are no laws about enrichment. Many GF foods are not fortified, so it’s not surprising that researchers have found that many people on a gluten free diet are eating less of these key nutrients than general population.   People on a gluten free diet also seem to be eating less calcium, fiber and grains than recommended, especially among women.

Calcium:

Calcium is particularly important to people with Celiac disease, since osteoporosis often occurs due to intestinal damage from CD, which can cause malabsorption of calcium and Vitamin D.  Also, many people with Celiac disease avoid dairy due to lactose intolerance.   In a study of people on a GF diet, less than a third of the women ate the recommended amounts of calcium, although most men did get the amounts recommended. When people start off on a gluten free diet, step one is figuring a way to take out all the gluten, and get adjusted to this new way of living and eating.  But as life starts to ease back to normal, it’s important to take the second step and eat a diet with all of the nutrients you need to feel better, allow your intestines to heal, and live well.

Iron:

A survey of people on a gluten free diet found that less than half of women are getting recommended amounts of iron.  This is particularly important, since many people with Celiac disease are anemic before going gluten free due to the constant intestinal damage and irritation.  Anemia often causes fatigue, weakness and poor concentration.   Liver and organ meats are great sources of iron, but there are a variety of foods and ways of combining foods with vitamin C that can help raise iron levels, too.

Fiber:

Most Americans are getting less fiber than recommended, and getting enough fiber can be even more challenging on a gluten free diet, since many high fiber cereals, breads and bars are off limits.   Fiber is best known for its help keeping people regular, but it is important in helping lower risk of heart disease and diabetes, too.

So what’s a gluten free gal (or guy) to do?

  • Take a (gluten free!) multivitamin
  • Choose fortified gluten free products
  • If you avoid dairy products, find other calcium fortified beverages and other high calcium foods
  • If you are feeling tired, talk to your doctor about getting your iron level tested.
  • Make sure you’re getting enough fiber!  Beans, flaxseed, and whole grain GF foods are a great source of fiber.
  • Consider speaking to a dietitian to make sure you’re getting what you need!

News:

The Center for Celiac Research at the University of Maryland is hosting its annual 2009 Celiac Walk/Run on May 3rd, 2009.  You can sign up or donate here.  If you’d like to donate to the DC Celiacs group, click on sponsor a participant on the left sidebar, type Susan Flinn in the search box, click search, and then select Susan Flinn.

The Center for Celiac Awareness is hosting the annual Gluten Free Cooking Spree on May 1st.  It’s always a good time, good food and tons of samples.  It’s $50 if you register by April 15th.

Harris Whole Health offers individual sessions, family sessions and group classes to help people eat healthier and feel better! For an appointment with Cheryl Harris, Registered Dietitian and Nutritionist, please email cheryl@harriswholehealth.com or call 571-271-8742.